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Gold Dome

March 22, 2023

Gold Dome Report – Committee Work Day

¡Feliz Navidad! As one Senator said in a committee meeting on Wednesday. Indeed, it was Christmastime for many under the gold dome as committees took one last opportunity to create their own festive holiday trees full of legislative ornaments. Christmas trees, vehicles, omnibus measures — whatever you call them, they’re the flavor du jour in the final days of any legislative session. If you’ve got a bill in a ditch, why not give one a try?

On Tuesday, the Senate Appropriations Committee met to pass out its version of the FY24 State Budget. According to Chairman Blake Tillery (R-Vidalia), the Senate version of the spending plan “more closely reflects” the budget proposed by Governor Kemp. You be the judge in this #GoldDomeReport.

In this Report:

  • Senate Appropriations Approves FY24 Budget
  • Committee Reports
  • New Legislation
  • What’s Next

Senate Appropriations Approves FY24 Budget

The Senate Appropriations Committee met to unveil and approve its take on the FY24 State Budget. Providing an overview of the changes, Chairman Blake Tillery (R-Vidalia) noted that the Senate version of the spending plan “more closely reflects” the budget proposed by Governor Kemp. The chairman also highlighted a number of key items, including restoration of Governor Kemp’s proposal to fund HOPE Scholarships at 100% of tuition for all eligible students, $40 million in funding for mental health staffing and facilities, funding for a total of 500 NOW and COMP waivers, and $1 million to clear the 700-person waitlist for services from the Statewide Independent Living Council.

The Senate is expected to take up the budget on Thursday, which will lead to a conference committee process where the House and Senate reconcile the differences between their two budgets. The full Senate tracking sheet for the budget may be found here.

Committee Reports

House Governmental Affairs Committee

The House Governmental Affairs Committee, chaired by Representative John LaHood (R-Valdosta), held its last expected meeting for the 2023 Legislative Session on Wednesday morning. The committee considered the following measure:

  • SB 145, authored by Senator Shawn Still (R-Norcross), is the "Landscape Equipment and Agricultural Fairness (LEAF) Act". The bill originally prohibited local regulations that create differing standards for or distinguish gasoline-powered leaf blowers from similar equipment.

LaHood announced that the bill is being used as a vehicle for several other bills that have passed out of various committees but did not cross over or achieve final passage. In addition to the original content of the bill, other bills in the substitute included:

  • HB 374, authored by Representative Brad Thomas (R-Holly Springs), amends Title 36 to repeal certain provisions relating to authority, procedures, identification, and status of lands relative to municipal deannexation. Thomas explained that there have been some cleanups to the language and that the Georgia Municipal Association is satisfied with the version of the language being considered.
  • HB 438, authored by Representative Victor Anderson (R-Cornelia), amends Title 46 to prohibit governmental entities from adopting any policy that prohibits the connection or reconnection of any utility service or sales of certain fuels based upon the appliance to be used by a customer.

The substitute as presented also included cleanup proposed by Representative Shea Roberts (D-Atlanta) related to unintended consequences from the implementation of HB 1405, the Zoning Procedures Law, passed last year.

Representative Houston Gaines (R-Athens) moved that the substitute be amended to include the text of HB 92, which amends Title 46 to modify the percentage limitation as to the amount of investments an electric membership corporation may make and maintain in a gas affiliate.

Representative Stephen Sainz (R-St. Marys) moved the substitute be amended to include the text of HB 206, which amends Title 36 to provide for the creation of Commercial Property Assessed Conservation, Energy, and Resiliency Development Authorities. The amendment was adopted.

Representative Teri Anulewicz (D-Smyrna) moved that the substitute be amended to include a sunset of December 31, 2027, for the sections relating to the original content of SB 145 and HB 438. The amendment failed.

Legislative counsel was authorized to make any necessary conforming amendments to incorporate the Gaines and Sainz amendments, and the committee recommended the bill DO PASS by Committee Substitute as Amended. It will proceed to the Rules Committee.

House Higher Education Committee

Chairman Chuck Martin (R-Alpharetta) and the Higher Education Committee met in the afternoon and took up these initiatives:

  • SB 112, authored by Senator Jason Anavitarte (R-Dallas), originally sought to create in Chapter 4 of Title 20 a pilot program whereby qualifying private nonprofit entities provide instruction and other services for eligible students who are 21 years of age and older to attain a high school diploma. It would be known as the “Workforce EXCELeration Act.”   the intent of the bill remains but Anavitarte and Chairman Martin discussed the committee substitute 5096S, changing eligible student requirements over 21 but under 30 years of age is now added; ensures citizenship; and previously enrolled in Georgia high school. It also changes private nonprofits to “third parties” or the State Board throughout the bill. A finding omitted the reference to the number of individuals without a diploma. It requires at least two programs to be offered and does not limit locations. It is subject to appropriations but authorizes the State Board to allocate the funding. The funds will be paid upon course completion. There had been prior discussion about “in the seats” funding and thus changed to course completion. Reporting requirements and outcomes are also addressed in the bill. The age was a question to Anavitarte, but the average age is 31-32 and those individuals should be included. At least two distinct programs are now included in the language but it is not limiting to just two. Accreditation was previously addressed as a concern to TCSG. Martin was open to amendments. Representative Jasmine Clark (D-Lilburn) raised concerns about capping the age as 800,000-1,000,000 are without diplomas and asked to cap at age 40.  Representative Karen Mathiak (R-Griffin) also was concerned about the age cap of 30. Representative David Knight (R-Griffin) asked about socioeconomic status and how it was defined. Representative Patty Bentley (D-Butler) indicated that the legislation has been worked on and she asked if the Committee would vote on the legislation. Knight indicated he had concerns about funding and appreciated the tightening of the legislation. Bentley moved to DO PASS the bill. Martin proposed an amendment to address the age so that it would cap at 30 at the time of enrollment, and his amendment was adopted. Knight asked that 30 be stricken and 35 be inserted. Representative Edna Jackson (D-Savannah) asked for the rationale to move to 35 and not to 40. Testimony on the bill before indicated the average age was 31-32. The motion to approve the age of 35 was approved. LC 500596S, as amended, was given a DO PASS recommendation, moving forward to the House Rules Committee. Chairman Ron Stephens (R-Savannah) will carry the legislation in the House.
  • SB 137, authored by Senator Max Burns (R-Sylvania), seeks to amend O.C.G.A. 20-3-411 as it left the Senate. A new substitute was offered for the committee to consider. Representative Katie Dempsey (R-Rome) and Chairman Martin came up with the Substitute which adds HB 228 (for nursing students and to help address that shortage) into SB 137 (critical workforce training needs), allowing students to access tuition equalization grants.  Section 2 is HB 228 and Section 3 is SB 137 (550 students would be eligible). Students must enroll by July 1, 2025. Representative Clark asked if money had been appropriated for this. Dempsey will carry the legislation in the House. Another question was raised about whether it would limit the number of private institutions — the bill does require that the schools must have been in the state for a decade. Clark asked about the schools that were asking for the legislation (schools that came after 2011).  Initially, when the committee considered LC 50 0597, it could not be voted upon as a quorum was lost by the committee. However, before the adjournment of the meeting, the bill received a DO PASS on the substitute. It moves forward to the House Rules Committee.
  • HR 281, authored by Representative Phil Olaleye (D-Democrat), creates the House Study Committee on Lottery Reserves, Reserves and Educational Programs. The committee reviewed LC 36 5522. Presently, there are $1.4 billion lottery reserves that would be studied so the General Assembly could determine how those moneys could be used to provide pre-K and HOPE scholarships and grants. There was discussion that this study was much needed. The committee inquired about the 50 percent requirement to be stored in reserves and whether other states require such a threshold. The committee stressed the need for data to make informed decisions. The committee will meet again next week to discuss the interim work.

Senate Regulated Industries Committee

Chairman Bill Cowsert (R-Athens) and the Regulated Industries Committee met this morning to take up the following bills:

  • HB 458, authored by Representative Clay Pirkle (R-Ashburn), seeks to regulate hemp production and sales in Chapter 23 of Title 2. Sarah Nichols, an owner of SJ Labs and Analytics in Macon which tests items for sale to consumers, testified in favor of the legislation. Cannabis is cannabis — hemp or marijuana variety. Testing is required for the safety of the consumer. There is a loophole as nothing is written on maximum dosage. Three milligrams of THC per gram is allowed. Many of the products sold are not tested before sales to consumers. The average consumer does not know what happens by ingesting 800 milligrams. Many products do not have safety panels on them but are sold in Georgia. She stressed the need for testing regulations for the hemp products. Oversight and regulation is needed for farmers and producers as well. She showed the committee a number of products; many are made all over the country. Products, such as those made in California which fail testing, are sold in Georgia. There is only one producer here in Georgia; Will Wingate produces products here in Georgia. Her lab will eventually produce medical marijuana products. Many of the products may be affected by pesticides and products not tested are on the market and some are being inhaled.  Pirkle closed discussion and asked for firm guardrails on hemp.
  • HB 196, authored by Representative Alan Powell (R-Hartwell), addresses the Georgia Access to Medical Cannabis Commission, requiring it to be subject to Georgia’s Administrative Procedures Act in O.C.G.A. 16-12-202(f). There has been discussion of abolishing the commission and moving it to the Department of Agriculture (that language is not in the legislation passed out of the House and before the Senate). No committee substitute was before the committee today, but the committee will meet again tomorrow. Seven years ago, the General Assembly discussed that medical cannabis has benefits.  Powell provided history on the commission and its work thus far to issue licenses. Powell also highlighted some of the aspects of the litigation around that process. According to Cowsert, he indicated that the commission has stated that dispensary licenses to be issued in April. The licenses not challenged are likely able to have products to the public in May-June 2023. The committee made inquiries on the numbers of patients who are signed up to get the oil, and Powell did not know the number or amount of oil which one production facility could produce for those individuals. Senator Greg Dolezal (R-Cumming) raised questions about the numbers of licenses to be issued, questioning whether all the licenses were needed to provide the product. In the current budget, there is $1.5 million to oversee the commission. The legislation is intended to provide an outlet for the entities which are embroiled in the protest/litigation by granting them a license, allowing the free market to prevail. Thus, it rewards the protestors. The legislation does allow more licenses with the growth of the “registry” of patients. However, the registry has dropped in numbers according to Powell. Powell also mentioned SB 97, which abolishes the Cannabis Commission in its entirety and moves operations to the Department of Agriculture and provides for oversight by the Legislature.

A Truleaf representative spoke to the legislation.

Vincent Russo, with TheraTrue (Louisville), also spoke to the legislation noting that TheraTrue came in as a runner up in the licenses for Schedule I (3rd place) and Schedule 2 (2nd place). None of the litigators have indicated that they will dismiss lawsuits and rewarding the protestors may only cause more litigation. Only one case remains for Class 2 licenses and that case is pending in Fulton County.

Another individual testified about providing for local control in making determinations of where the dispensaries are located in the state, noting that the concern is long-term dependency issues. The Cannabis Commission amended its rules in February, requiring the demonstration of demand for new applicants.

A lawyer rose to speak to the committee on behalf of the protesting companies. She noted the promises made by the General Assembly to provide access to the medications as they are not served by the current commission. The procurement process was a disaster. She stressed that there has been a lack of transparency in the process. Cowsert asked if the entire process should be scrapped and reopened; it would not be the best solution using a new procurement.

Derek Bower, counsel to FFD one of the license awardees in the procurement (Class 2), agrees that they want to get the medicine to folks as quickly as possible. It will not end the litigation. The process is broken. The Constitution prohibits the General Assembly to reward companies who lost in this manner. He acknowledged that there are 27,000 patients now on the registry and the companies now are likely to have more than enough.

Robin Fowler, a physician, trained at Emory. He is the founder of Botanical Sciences in Madison, focusing on patient care. He argued, based on numbers, the currently licensed can provide. Class 1 licensees can take care of 1 million patients. There were questions raised by independent pharmacies about sales of the products by them — they have conversations with DEA and GDNA. Two companies are ready to go to market now.

Yolanda Henderson testified as a doctor of naturopathy and a MS survivor. This legislation should be revised at a later date as patients are waiting for medical cannabis.

Yolanda Bennett also spoke to the committee, since cards have been available and are paying every two years for a card ($150-$450 for evaluation and sometimes must do that multiple times per year). She asked for subsidies so folks do not incur the fees as they are not covered by insurance. There is no listing of physicians who will conduct the evaluations for the registry.

The committee adjourned and did not take any action on the legislation.

Senate Finance Committee

Chair Chuck Hufstetler (R-Rome) called the Finance Committee to order to discuss the following measures:

  • HB 86, authored by Representative Trey Rhodes (R-Greensboro), seeks to amend Code Section 48-8-3 to address the Atlanta Zoo and Aquarium. Senator Brandon Beach (R-Alpharetta) offered an amendment to attach SB 153. This is a voluntary two percent stadium surcharge tax to raise funds for capital outlay projects for public safety. This would be a voluntary tax for the city. Senator John Albers (R-Roswell) also amended the measure to change the sunset to December 31, 2026, and removed the word “state.” An amendment was added to include the aquarium and zoo. The measure passed with one dissent.
  • HB 454, authored by Representative Shaw Blackmon (R-Bonaire), amends Title 48 of the O.C.G.A. This is the annual IRC cleanup bill. Section 2 is IRC updates and perpetuates manufacturers to dispense. Sections 2-5 are technical changes from accountants and economists from HB 1437 to get the standard deductions. New language was added to modify force majeure to capture pandemics in natural disasters. A substitute was presented, which includes provisions relating to the Wellstar hospital closure. This measure passed with one dissent.

Judiciary Non-Civil Committee – Hong Subcommittee

Chair Soo Hong (R-Lawrenceville) convened the subcommittee to finish the discussion on the following measures:

  • SB 31, authored by Senator Beach, amends Article 1 of Chapter 18 of Title 15 of the O.C.G.A. to allow for the Attorney General’s Office to be reimbursed should a local District Attorney choose not to prosecute criminal cases. The intent of this bill emerges from local district attorneys refusing to prosecute women who receive an abortion. Beach’s goal is to ensure that district attorneys are prosecuting all laws passed by the General Assembly, and if those laws are not prosecuted, the offices that do will be reimbursed for their work. Hong asked about the 15 days from the judge hearing the motion. Beach mentioned Representative Stan Gunter (R-Blairsville) had reviewed this part of the bill. Gabriel Carter from ACCG expressed concern over the measure. A discussion unfolded on the cost to counties.

Representative Tyler Paul Smith (R-Bremen) asked if this version had any changes in the measure. Currently, it does not have any amendments. The measure received a DO PASS recommendation.

  • SB 68, authored by Senator Rick Williams (R-Milledgeville), amends Title 16 of the O.C.G.A to include the offense of dogfighting as a predicate crime for purposes of the racketeer-influenced and corrupt organizations statute.

Jessica Rock from the Prosecuting Attorneys Council expressed support for the measure.

The measure received a DO PASS recommendation.

  • SB 63, authored by Senator Randy Robertson (R-Cataula), amends Title 17 of the O.C.G.A. to provide for the setting of bonds and schedules of bails. Specifically, the bill adds numerous offenses to the list of bail-restricted offenses in O.C.G.A. 17-6-12 and limits and adds restrictions to the availability of unsecured judicial release. A substitute was presented, which included changes on line 31 was struck; line 32 mirrors other code sections; and lines 90, 95, and 101 changed reckless driving and theft by taking to second or subsequent offenses. On line 127, struck affray; lines 251 and 257 returned judges' time back to existing law and struck domestic terrorism on line 395.

Mazie Lynn Guertin expressed concern over the measure but appreciated many of the changes.

Representative Tanya Miller (D-Atlanta) expressed concern over the measure and adding non-violent offenses to bail-restricted offenses. Robertson mentioned nonprofit bond groups, which will be something to work on outside of the session. The measure passed along a party-line vote where the chair had to break the tie.

  • SB 92, authored by Robertson, amends Title 15 of the O.C.G.A. to create the Prosecuting Attorneys Qualifications Commission. LC 48 0938S creates a commission with eight members divided into a five-member investigative panel and a three-member hearing panel. This investigative panel will review alleged misconduct. The hearing panel is responsible for any formal charges, disciplinary orders, formal advisory opinions, and issuing standards or recommendations of the investigative panel. The measure explains how commission members shall be chosen and the leadership election within the commission. Grounds for discipline for district attorneys and solicitor-generals include abuse of power, willful misconduct, failure to carry out duties, the conviction of a crime involving moral turpitude, prejudicial conduct which brings disrepute to the office, and allowing an assistant in their charge to commit any act constituting grounds for removal. It does prohibit the commission from entertaining a complaint based on changing a decision, plea offer, continuance, placement on a trial calendar, or recommendations relating to bonds unless there is plausibility. The measure creates a formal process for filing formal charges and the service of those charges.

Representative Tanya Miller (D-Atlanta) asked about reimbursement for those who have been exonerated. Robertson said as the language is now, there is no mechanism for this. Representative Rob Leverett (R-Elberton) asked if the investigative panel would be the group to review complaints. That is correct, and it would be made up of a group of peers.

Forsyth County Solicitor General Bill Finch and Bibb County Solicitor General Rebecca Grist expressed concern over the measure. Taylor Hawkins from Frontline Policy Council and District Attorney John Cranford expressed support for the measure.

No action was taken on this measure.

  • SB 12, authored by Senator Albers, seeks to amend Title 16 of the O.C.G.A. to create the "Protecting Victims and Dismantling Georgia Street Gangs Act." This measure passed to the House last year but did not make it through sine die. Section one creates the title. Section two increases the penalty for those on probation from 5 to 10 years found with a firearm. Section three is the declaration on gangs. Section four allows the local government to bring civil actions against bad actors. Section five focuses on repeat offenders. Section six improves venue options. Section seven addresses bonds in gang crimes in superior courts. Section eight focuses on elder and minor abuse by gangs. Section nine allows prior evidence and abuse to be admissible for cases involving elder and minor abuse by gangs.

Benjamin Lynde with the ACLU and Mazie Lynn Guertin from the Georgia Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers expressed concern over the measure. Fulton County Special District Attorney John Floyd expressed support for the measure.

Representative Tanya Miller (D-Atlanta) expressed an understanding of the intent of the measure but has further questions about the measure.

No action was taken on this measure.

Judiciary Non-Civil Committee

Chair Tyler Paul Smith (R-Bremen) called the committee to order to discuss the following measures:

  • SB 92, authored by Senator Robertson, amends Title 15 of the O.C.G.A. to create the Prosecuting Attorneys Qualifications Commission. LC 48 0938S creates a commission with eight members which would divide into a five-member investigative panel and a three-member hearing panel. This investigative panel will review alleged misconduct. The hearing panel is responsible for any formal charges, disciplinary orders, formal advisory opinions, and issuing standards or recommendations of the investigative panel. The measure explains how commission members shall be chosen and the election of leadership within the commission. Grounds for discipline for district attorneys and solicitor-generals include abuse of power, willful misconduct, failure to carry out duties, the conviction of a crime involving moral turpitude, prejudicial conduct which brings disrepute to the office, and allowing any act constituting grounds for removal. It does prohibit the commission from entertaining a complaint based on changing a decision, plea offer, continuance, placement on a trial calendar, or recommendations relating to bonds unless there is plausibility. The measure creates a formal process for filing formal charges and the service of those charges.

The measure received a DO PASS recommendation.

  • SB 31, authored by Beach, amends Article 1 of Chapter 18 of Title 15 of the O.C.G.A. to allow for the Attorney General’s Office to be reimbursed should a local district attorney choose not to prosecute criminal cases. The intent of this bill emerges from local district attorneys refusing to prosecute women who receive an abortion. Beach’s goal is to ensure that district attorneys are prosecuting all laws passed by the General Assembly, and if those laws are not prosecuted, the offices that do will be reimbursed for their work. Hong asked about the 15 days from the Judge hearing the motion. Beach mentioned Representative Stan Gunter (R-Blairsville) had reviewed this part of the bill. Gabriel Carter from ACCG expressed concern over the measure. A discussion unfolded on the cost to counties.

The measure received a DO PASS recommendation.

  • SB 68, authored by Senator Rick Williams (R-Milledgeville), amends Title 16 of the O.C.G.A. to include the offense of dogfighting as a predicate crime for purposes of the racketeer-influenced and corrupt organizations statute. The measure received a DO PASS recommendation.
  • SB 63, authored by Robertson, amends Title 17 of the O.C.G.A. to provide for the setting of bonds and schedules of bails. Specifically, the bill adds numerous offenses to the list of bail-restricted offenses in O.C.G.A. 17-6-12 and limits and adds restrictions to the availability of unsecured judicial release. A substitute was presented, which included changes on line 31 was struck; line 32 mirrors other code sections; and lines 90, 95, and 101 changed reckless driving and theft by taking to second or subsequent offenses. On line 127, struck affray; lines 251 and 257 returned judges' time back to existing law and struck domestic terrorism on line 395.

Representative Charlice Byrd (R-Woodstock) asked if magistrate judges had been consulted on this bill. Robertson said he had consulted with them. Representative Roberts asked why he was adding so many nonviolent crimes to the list, with jails being so full. Robertson explained it is not that the judicial system is being tougher, it is more people committing crimes. Overcrowding often comes from administrative issues. Representative Tanya Miller (D-Atlanta) discussed innocence until proven guilty, no matter the level of violence. She asked for clarity on whether it was the author's intent to expand the cash-only offenses and how it implicates the presumption of innocence.

Representative Matt Reeves (R-Duluth) offered the first to copy lines 95-96, and add it to line 100, which passed. He also suggested adding HB 505, LC 480853, as passed by the House to this bill, which failed. The Georgia Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers explained the vagueness of the language. His comments resulted in a discussion on violence and tumultuous conduct. There was also a discussion on whether the second amendment was germane to the underlying bill. Soo Hong amended the bill on line 79 to strike the word “street.” The measure passed with the chair breaking the tie.

  • SB 36, authored by Senator Robertson, amends Title 16 of the O.C.G.A. of the O.C.G.A. to increase the penalty provisions relating to pimping and pandering. Specifically, the bill elevates pimping and pandering to a felony in the first offense and requires a minimum of one year imprisonment. Robertson presented the bill to the committee, explaining that the bill was passed by the Senate last year but failed to achieve final passage in the House.

Representative Reeves offered an amendment to restrict gun possession at gated or ticketed events like Music Midtown. This amendment passed. Reeves offered another amendment to add HB 446, which enhances penalties for drive-by shootings. The amendment passed. Smith added on lines 32, 44, and 60 “if the trial court in the interest of justice will not be served by the imposition of prescribed mandatory minimum sentence which shall be stated in the record by the court.”

Representative Barry Fleming (R-Harlem) needed clarity on the committee substitute and sections two and three. A representative from the CJCC came forward. Victims of human trafficking who commit a crime can have their records cleared. However, when you enter a first-offender plea, their conviction is withheld, so they cannot have it voided out. This section is narrowly tailored for those victims.

The measure received a DO PASS recommendation as amended.

New Legislation

The following legislation of interest has been introduced. Since the General Assembly is beyond Crossover Day, new legislation requiring action in both chambers is not eligible to achieve final passage by both chambers during this legislative session, but it will be available for consideration during the 2024 Legislative Session.

H.B.810

Professions and businesses; electrical contractors, plumbers, conditioned air contractors, low voltage contractors, and utility contractors; change certain provisions

Rep. Kenneth "Ken" Vance (R-133)

https://www.legis.ga.gov/legislation/65538

H.R.576

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine South Georgia; commend

Rep. Chas Cannon (R-172)

https://www.legis.ga.gov/legislation/65546

S.B.324

State Printing and Documents; a victim centered address confidentiality program; provide

Sen. Kim Jackson (D-041)

https://www.legis.ga.gov/legislation/65588

S.R.371

Senate Study Committee on Rural Medical Personnel Recruitment; create

Sen. Bo Hatchett (R-050)

https://www.legis.ga.gov/legislation/65533

What’s Next

The General Assembly will reconvene for Legislative Day 38 on Thursday, March 23. 

The House is expected to consider the following measures on Legislative Day 38:

  • SB 45 - Education; care of students being treated for epilepsy or a seizure disorder; provide (Substitute)(Ed-13th) Anavitarte-31st
  • SB 65 - Commissioner of Insurance; general provisions; establishing an advisory committee; provisions; authorize (Substitute)(Ins-12th) Watson-1st
  • SB 86 - Education; eligible students participating in the Dual Enrollment program to access HOPE career grant funds for certain CTAE courses; allow (Substitute)(HEd-179th) Brass-28th
  • SB 91 - Workers' Compensation; the time period for the dissolution of the Subsequent Injury Trust Fund; extend (Substitute)(I&L-120th) Dixon-45th
  • SB 95 - Solid Waste Trust Fund; specify the manner in which funds appropriated shall be used (Substitute)(NR&E-166th) Robertson-29
  • SB 129 - Primaries and Elections; time off for employees to advance vote; provide (Substitute)(GAff-123rd) Williams-25th
  • SB 158 - Property Insurance; insurance premium discount or rate reduction for property owners; tornado, hurricane, or other catastrophic windstorm events; provide (Ins-15th) Robertson-29th
  • SB 197 - "Health Care Practitioners Truth and Transparency Act"; enact (Substitute)(Hth-127th) Hufstetler-52nd
  • SB 199 - State's Employee Benefit Plan Council; council to establish health savings accounts; require (Substitute)(Hth-49th) Dolezal-27th
  • SB 204 - Education Accountability; recognition of certain accrediting agencies as evaluators of the quality of education offered in public schools in this state; provide (Substitute)(Ed-36th) Dolezal-27th

The Senate is expected to consider the following measures on Legislative Day 38:

  • HB 19 - General appropriations; State Fiscal Year July 1, 2023 - June 30, 2024
  • HB 76 - Professions and businesses; education, experience, and training requirements for licensure in marriage and family therapy; revise provisions
  • HB 80 - Uniform Unsworn Declarations Act; enact
  • HB 87 - Nontraditional Special Schools Act; enact
  • HB 126 - Appeal and error; judgments deemed directly appealable; change a provision
  • HB 128 - Revenue and taxation; representation of minority business enterprises, women and veteran owned businesses in procurement of state contracts; provide
  • HB 175 - Motor vehicles; federal regulations regarding safe operation of commercial motor vehicle and carriers; update reference date
  • HB 189 - Highways, bridges, and ferries; allowable variance for weight limitations upon a vehicle or load; provide for
  • HB 243 - Coweta Judicial Circuit; superior court; provide eighth judge
  • HB 309 - Health; financial stability requirements for applicants and licensees of personal care homes and assisted living communities; revise provisions
  • HB 327 - Crimes and offenses; incest; include step-grandparent and step-grandchild relationship
  • HB 353 - Georgia Lottery for Education Act; administrative procedures regarding coin operated amusement machines shall be subject to Chapter 13 of Title 50; provide
  • HB 383 - Safer Hospitals Act; enact
  • HB 437 - Georgia State Indemnification Commission; abolish and authorize commissioner of administrative services to assume duties; provisions
  • HB 475 - Code Revision Commission; revise, modernize and correct errors in omissions
  • HB 480 - Workers' compensation; benefits; change certain provisions
  • HB 529 - Insurance; minimum amounts of uninsured and underinsured coverage to be maintained by transportation network and taxi service companies; provide
  • HB 572 - Elections; rename Georgia Government Transparency and Campaign Finance Commission as the State Ethics Commission